Blog

Projekti nga FOCUS architecture

Supreme Hotel & Spa

Project name:
Typology:
Studio:
Architect:

Location:
Status:
Construction year:
Floor Area:
Floors:
Photography:
Collaborators:

Supreme Hotel & Spa
Hotel
FOCUS architecture
Arch. Gentian Parruca, Arch. Enkelejd Karanxha, Arch. Redon Iljasllari
Qerret, Durrës, Albania
Constructed
2019
9450 m²
7

Con/Ing. Arton Poro, Ing. Alket Kumaraku, Ing. Artan Dersha, Ing. Denis Sinjari, Ing. Arber Capo

Given the natural beauty of Qerreti Beach, the ever-increasing tourist flow, and the need for high quality hotels, the need for modern contemporary construction is high. This is what the project seeks to accomplish.
The 7-floor above the ground plan + the loft and the basement underground,
identifies the structure of the reinforced concrete construction between the two existing buildings, respecting the respective distances from these objects and the property boundary. The facility is accessed by the secondary road to the south-east. In the accommodation project between the road and the entrance, a ‘barrier’ square is envisaged to make the hotel entrance more visible. Exterior layouts include pedestrian areas, car crossings and parking lots, green spaces and outdoor parking.

The elevation development of the new structure divides it by functions:
On the ground floor of 1,217 m² are the SPA Area, Indoor Swimming Pool, Gym, Kitchens, Technical Service, Storage and Staircase and Elevator Group. On the 895m² 8 ground floor, there is the Reception, lobby, bar – restaurant, auxiliary facilities, electric cab with generator and stair-elevator corps. Upstairs are developed hotel rooms, which are connected to the hallway and the emergency stairs, positioned in the center of the building, to eliminate long distances from the hotel room doors. Upstairs there is an accommodation of 121 different standard rooms. Double rooms, triple rooms and suites.

Vertical movement in the object is done through two 2 lifts, with a capacity of 8 people each and emergency stairs provided with fire resistant doors and facade openings (natural lighting).
On the ground floor, on the east side of the planimetric solution, is the entrance hall, with an area of 256 m². Halls paving is provided with marble while the walls are lined with boiserie, decorative paint and marble skin. The ceilings are with KNAUF gypsum hinged ceilings (REI 90). The technical premises have an area of 50m². On the west side of the ground floor is a restaurant overlooking the sea, with an area of 379 m².

Room Typologies:

  • Double standard room with an area of 30-33 m²
  • Tripple room with an area of 37 m²
  • Suites with an area of 49-52 m².

The floors of the rooms are paved with 1.4 cm engineering flooring. Under the leveling layer will be placed (phonostop) to eliminate noise coming in the vertical direction. The interior walls are painted with eco-friendly paint. Hanging ceilings are made out of KNAUF plaster again (REI 90) and the corridor between the rooms is paved with marble.

The volume of the building is simple, treated with straight lines and clean volumes. The ground floor and the last floor are treated with semi-structural glass facade, in which white volumes are coated with ALPOLIC tiles, modulated to fit the architecture of the building. Volumes give the idea of three opaque volumes, with openings from floor level to ceiling. Being located near the sea and for tourists, it has been necessary to equip the hotel rooms with lodges. To change the rhythm of the functional layout of the dormitories, the facade has been treated with different positioning of the windows and the lodges.

The treatment of facade with glass materials, and ALPOLIC coats, make the building easily distinguishable from other residential buildings. The technology used for the facade was a ventilated facade. This type of technology has been selected to reduce energy consumption as much as possible and to protect the facility from the overheating of solar radiation. In the glass facade, it is intended to use a structural facade, with thermal structure and thermal glass.

The main challenge of this project was the first request from investors, whether it would be possible to start work in September (the date that coincides with the end of the summer season) and to end on June 30 (the date that coincides with the start of the summer season). This was a requirement almost beyond any construction logic, considering the volume of work we would face: a 9200 m2 building area plus the interior design of the hotel. And after a discussion inside the studio, we agreed. We knew that a perfect building would require well-defined projects and details, but most of all we needed professional, capable and selfless collaborators. So we formed a team that helped us out, until the last minutes. The coordination of the architects in the office and  engineers in the field has been perfect. One of the other requirements that the design studio faced was to furnish rooms with sea views. The request was successfully completed, as all rooms overlook the sea.

about FOCUS architecture

The studio opened in 2009 and deals mainly with architectural design and interior design. It also deals with the implementation of the objects it designs. FOCUS architecture is located at “Mihail Popi” Street, s.27, Entrance 3, 1st Floor, Apt. no.7, Tirana.

VOLLEE for Masiero

A design by the milanese design Studio Lorenz + Kaz for Masiero, the collection Vollee reinterprets light as lightness, like a hot-air balloon that takes off to explore new worlds. The suspension can be used as a single unit or in various combinations like a big swarm.

The reflector has the shape of a sail and comes in two sizes, which can be orientated towards the ceiling or the floor. Vollee gives it’s characterful imprint to many different ambient situations.

As a single or double unit it works very well as a table light, as a crowd it is most adaptable for big entrance halls and staircases.

Source: lorenz-kaz.com

Luna’s Mexican Street Food

Project name:
Typology:
Studio:
Architect:
Location:
Status:
Construction year:
Floor Area:
Floors:
Photography:
Collaborators:

Luna’s Mexican Street Food
Restaurant
Createur Studio
Createur Studio
341 E. Huron St Ann Arbor, Mi 48104
Constructed
2017
224.16 m2
1
Carlos Jordan

Using the energy of the street food scene as inspiration, the design and branding for Luna’s Mexican Street Food in Ann Arbor, Michigan is bright, raw, angular and fun. The restaurant shares the space with Ahmo’s mediterianian restaurant so we created a pallet of materials that distinguished the 2 unique restaurants with complimenting finishes. The ordering process was designed to maximize efficiency for placing orders, online order pick-up and cashwrap.

We worked with the owner to create an efficient menu for easy order placing and to help reduce wait time. We broke the menu down into 5 steps( dish, base, protein, toppings, salsas) and representing each items as an icon, ordering is fast and simple. The colors used reference fresh lettuce, avocado, corn and other fresh produce. The branding extends to the take-out menus, uniforms, signage, packaging, as well as a painted mural on the side of the restaurant.

The irregular triangular letter forms craft a logo that conveys a fun energy, while also referencing the forms of tortilla chips and taco shells. The angular forms are also present in the icon set that is used in the simple to understand menu.

HIGHLIGHT: SANAA

SANAA (Sejima and Nishizawa and Associates) is a multiple award-winning architectural firm based in Tokyo, Japan. It was founded in 1995 by architects Kazuyo Sejima (1956) and Ryue Nishizawa (1966).  For more than 20 years, the architects have worked together in their collaborative partnership, where it is virtually impossible to untangle which individual is responsible for what aspect of a particular project. Each building is ultimately a work that comes from the union of their two minds. Together they have produced major commissions, such as  the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa (both in Japan), the Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum (Ohio), De Kunstline Theater and Cultural Center (Almere, the Netherlands), the New Museum of Contemporary Art (New York, NY),  Rolex Learning Center (Lausanne, Switzerland), and the recent Tsuruoka Cultural Hall (Tsuruoka, Japan).

Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa

The buildings by Sejima and Nishizawa seem deceptively simple. The architects hold a vision of a building as a seamless whole, where the physical presence retreats and forms a sensuous background for people, objects, activities, and landscapes. They explore like few others the phenomenal properties of continuous space, lightness, transparency, and materiality to create a subtle synthesis. Sejima and Nishizawa’s architecture stands in direct contrast with the bombastic and rhetorical. Instead, they seek the essential qualities of architecture that result in a much-appreciated straightforwardness, economy of means, and restraint in their work.

Tsuruoka Cultural Hall, Tsuruoka, Japan - 2017

It may be tempting to view Sejima and Nishizawa’s refined compositions of lightness and transparency as elitist or rarefied. Their aesthetic, however, is one of inclusion. Their approach is fresh, always offering new possibilities within the normal constraints of an architectural project as it systematically takes the next step. They use common, everyday materials while remaining attuned to the possibilities of contemporary technology; their understanding of space does not reproduce conventional models.

21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan - 2004

They often opt for non-hierarchical spaces, or in their own words, the “equivalence of spaces,” creating unpretentious, democratic buildings according to the task and budget at hand. One example is the Almere project in the Netherlands, with its many simple classrooms and workshops, all presenting privileged views of the sea.

DeKunstlinie Theater and Cultural Center - Almere, Netherlands - 2007

Another example is the Rolex Learning Centre in Lausanne, a space to be used by students day and night. Sejima and Nishizawa originally conceived it as a multi-story building, but, in the course of their deliberation, it became a single yet vast, flowing space. The building’s many spaces (library, restaurant, exhibition areas, offices, etc.) are differentiated not by walls but by undulations of a continuous floor, which rises and falls to accommodate the different uses, while allowing vistas across this internal “landscape for people.”

The Rolex Learning Center, Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne, Switzerland (EPFL) - 2009

The relation of the building to its context is of utmost importance to Sejima and Nishizawa. They have called public buildings “mountains in the landscape,” believing that they should never lose the natural and meaningful connection with their surroundings. The New Museum in New York feels at home in the rough Bowery area of the city.

New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York City, New York - 2007

Their glass-enclosed museums, such as the Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio, blur the borders between inside and out, providing direct and changing views to the surroundings.

Glass Pavilion, Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio - 2006
Louvre Lens Gallery, Lens, France - 2006

For architecture that is simultaneously delicate and powerful, precise and fluid, ingenious but not overly or overtly clever; for the creation of buildings that successfully interact with their contexts and the activities they contain, creating a sense of fullness and experiential richness; for a singular architectural language that springs from a collaborative process that is both unique and inspirational; for their notable completed buildings and the promise of new projects together, Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa are the recipients of the 2010 Pritzker Architecture Prize.

Grace Farms, New Canaan, United States - 2015

Source: pritzkerprize.com

Colors in Architecture

“Color is an integral element of our world, not just in the natural environment but also in the man-made architectural environment. Color always played a role in the human evolutionary process. The environment and its colors are perceived, and the brain processes and judges what it perceives on an objective and subjective basis. Psychological influence, communication, information, and effects on the psyche are aspects of our perceptual judgment processes. Hence, the goals of color design in an architectural space are not relegated to decoration alone.” – by Frank H. Mahnke.

In this article we will see how colors stand in Architecture based on Color Theory of the painter Wassily Kandinsky.

Maden Group

Wassily Kandinsky’s art explored the relationship between color and its viewers. He eschewed the grays, browns and blacks of Cubism, embracing color as the primary vehicle for expression. In doing so he completely separated painting from a need to depict a subject. The goal of Kandinsky’s art was to capture music in a plastic medium, to evoke the same feelings a piece of music could evoke through shades and hues.

The theories he developed about color and meaning would prove influential in all creative fields, with the De Stijl movement expanding his philosophies and incorporating color into industrial design and architecture. Employing the color wheel, Kandinsky went through each hue, explaining the feelings it evoked, emotions it captured, and the sound it “made.”

Cycling through the colors of the rainbow, here is a sample of Kandinsky’s thoughts on color from his book “Concerning the Spiritual in Art”. If you are considering a vibrant cladding product for your next building, be inspired by the master of the whole spectrum:

Wassily Kandinsky

Red: alive, restless, confidently striving towards a goal, glowing, “manly maturity.”

Translated into sound: “sound of a trumpet, strong and harsh,” Fanfare, Tuba, deep notes on the cello, clear violin.

Park Gate, X-Plan Studio

Orange: a mixture of red and yellow, radiant, healthy, serious.

Translated into sound: middle range church bell, an alto voice.

Renovation and Extension of ArcelorMittal's Baragaño

Yellow: “warm, cheeky, and exciting, disturbing for people, typical earthly color… representing madness in color, an attack of rage, blind madness, maniacal rage.”

Translated into sound: loud sharp trumpets and high fanfares.

The Yellow Palace, Studio raça arkitektura

Green: stillness and peace, but with a hidden, passive strength. “Green is like a fat, very healthy cow lying still and unmoving, only capable of chewing the cud, regarding the world with stupid dull eyes.”

Translated into sound: quiet drawn out middle position violin.

Antas Educative Center, AVA Architects

Blue: deep, inner, supernatural, peaceful. “Sinking towards black, it has the overtone of a mourning that is not human … typical heavenly color.”

Translated into sound: the flute, cello, and organ.

Didden Village MVRDV

Unfortunately Kandinsky didn’t distinguish between blue and indigo. Apparently they were the same to him.

Herzog & de Meuron’s Museu Blau

Violet: a mixture of red and blue, “morbid, extinguished … sad.”

Translated into sound: the english horn and bassoon.

Purple Hill House, IROJE KHM

Source: architizer.com

Nappe by Masiero

Marco Zito, an italian architect specialised in product design, interior design and architecture, draws inspiration from the Venetian tradition for a project that totally marries MASIERO philosophy: a decorative lighting system that represent a bridge between contemporary and classic style.

The big decorative tassels that brings together and adorn the historical palaces’ curtains, are reinterpreted, summarized and decomposed to delete every classical assets and obtain contemporary designed elements. The project considers 10 elements different in shape, details or decorative elements, that can be combined together to obtain personalized compositions.
Metal turning’s frame is enriched with brushed brass details and the traditional textile fringes are replaced with small varnished or gold metallic beams.

The characteristic technical element, that has been elaborated to be a distinctive aesthetic mark as well, is the ceiling fixing system: brass spheres connect the power wire one to each other and fix the elements to the ceiling, drawing a lines plot between elements.
The tassels gave a very modern and minimalist design, intensified by the touch-effect matt pastel finishings, even if a total white finishing is available as well.

Source: marcozito.com

Architecture through Illustrations

One of the key elements during the design process is how you represent the project before it comes to life. And for this are used many methods, from hand drawing to realistic visualization with computer softwares. Architects and architecture students prefer to represent their projects through renderings, to show the attributes of an architectural design.

Recently, more attention has been paid to the graphics used in presenting a project, making it more artistic. Illustration is one of the methods of representing an architectural design and not only. Illustrations that depict an architectural project in a simplified form often allow a viewer to focus on specific features without the distraction of photorealism. Below we present to you some architectural illustrations that will probably make you switch from rendering to illustration.

Nina Illustrations

Sunset

by LAAGO Architects 

Macro scale conceptual proposal

by DEA Studio

Architecture Illustrations

by Jora Kasapi

The Illustrations represent several collages realized with different postproduction techniques. Some of them were part of comissioned work and some realized for research projects or simple competitions.

The evening walk and Tirana by night

by Blerus

Illustrations

by Dashnor Kadiri

Urban moments

by Enxhi Daci

Urban design for urban regeneration in the warehouse area, Vau i Dejës city.

Path on monochrome

by Denis Muça

arkitekte Nesila Hajdini

SEE WELL, EYE CLINIC

Project name:
Typology:
Studio:
Architect:
Location:
Status:
Construction year:
Floor Area:
Floors:
Photography:
Collaborators:

See Well
Eye clinic
Nesila Hajdini Architecture
Nesila Hajdini
Tiranë, Albania
Constructed
2019
126 m2
1
Skeria Lako, Nesila Hajdini
Porcelanosa, Vita Lux light, Glass Design.al, Abiesse

Arkitekte Nesila Hajdini
Foto Skeria Lako
The  See Well clinic project  is designed to provide a high quality service and at the same time to provide a pleasant environment during your medical visit.
The whole concept of space distribution is built on the creation of a central point of reference  that concludes with the only existing column in the central space,  from where all the space/flow distribution will take place.
Plani i projekti See Well
Nesila Hajdini architecture
Inspired by the eye structure itself, distribution to the  doctors & diagnostics’s rooms,  it is realised through ” light guidelines,” originating from the central pillar. Not casually, the reception is there, as clients  can easily orient themselves into the clinic.
Genesis of the whole project is the “light”, that diffuses into the other spaces, located around its source.
Arkitekte Nesila Hajdini
The space is divided into two main areas of pure geometric shapes:
2. Reception area, where  you will find the the reception, waiting space  and the accessories showcase wall.
3. The service area, which is  also formed  by geometric figures, where besides the two doctor’s rooms, there is a meeting room, a kitchen, a toilet and it finalises  with the  two diagnostic rooms. 
Arkitekte Nesila Hajdini
Nesila Hajdini Architecture
Skeria Lako

A minimalist style with a gray and white palette was deliberately chosen to communicate the sensation of a large, clean space indispensable for a clinic. The colors of the clinic’s logo are also taken into account, by  choosing the red color as the  biding element on the clinic’s mobile furniture. The whole space is crossed by light lines, which start from the recesption and spread into the space like ray of light, directing the client from one diagnostic room to another.

Nesila Hajdini Architecture
Arkitekte Nesila Hajdini
The clinic is located in one of the highlighted neighborhoods of Tirana, though  not right by the main street, but with a high circualtion on path in front of it.
To create a game between the outside and the inside, the waiting area is separated from the street by a vertical, semi-transparent structure. This choice  dims life inside the clinic, as seen  from the outside and still provides some intimancy for the patients.
Arkitekte Nesila Hajdini
Due to its location, not on the verge of the main, the client request was to make  main façade be as visible as possible from a distance. This demand, in addition of the light compostion in the  interior design, was reinforced by bringing an artistic  showcase, conceived with glass sculptures made by glass craftsman Vasil Dhiamanti. The eye’s IRIS  comes abstracted with all the colors, shades, transparency that follows life inside the clinic to another artistic dimension.
Glass Design detail
Arkitekte Nesila Hajdini

These glass sculptures, positioned where the only natural light source is, transform the interior through the color dance emited under the effects of changing sunlight.

Nesila Hajdini Architecture
Nesila Hajdini Architecture

HIGHLIGHT: TOYO ITO

Toyo Ito , born 1 June 1941, is a Japanese architect known for creating conceptual architecture, in which he seeks to simultaneously express the physical and virtual worlds. He is a leading exponent of architecture that addresses the contemporary notion of a “simulated” city, and has been called “one of the world’s most innovative and influential architects.”

Throughout his career, Toyo Ito has been able to produce a body of work that combines conceptual innovation with superbly executed buildings. Creating outstanding architecture for more than 40 years, he has successfully undertaken libraries, houses, parks, theaters, shops, office buildings and pavilions, each time seeking to extend the possibilities of architecture. A professional of unique talent, he is dedicated to the process of discovery that comes from seeing the opportunities that lie in each commission and each site.

Innovative is a word often used to describe Toyo Ito’s works. This is apparent in the temporary pavilion created in Bruges in 2002 and the TOD’S building in Tokyo in 2004 where the building skin also serves as structure.

Bruges Pavilion
TOD’S building

In addition, his buildings abound with new technological inventions, as can be seen in the Dome in Odate or the Tower of Winds of Yokohama. This innovation is only possible through Ito’s process of carefully and objectively analyzing each situation before proposing a solution.

Odate Dome
Tower of Winds

Ito has said that he strives for architecture that is fluid and not confined by what he considers to be the limitations of modern architecture. In the Sendai Mediatheque, 2000, he achieved this by structural tubes, which permitted new interior spatial qualities.

Sendai Mediatheque

In the Taichung Metropolitan Opera House, the horizontal and vertical network of spaces creates opportunities for communication and connection. Seeking freedom from the rigidity of a grid, Ito is interested in relationships — between rooms, exterior and interior, and building and surroundings. Toyo Ito‘s work has drawn on inspiration from the principles of nature, as evidenced by the unity achieved between organic-like structures, surface and skin.

Taichung Metropolitan Opera House

Toyo Ito’s personal creative agenda is always coupled with public responsibility. Of his many inspiring spaces, the Municipal Funeral Hall in Gifu Prefecture of 2006 or the Tama Art University Library in Tokyo, 2007 or the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London in 2002 are but three examples that illustrate Ito’s cognizant understanding of the people and the activities within his buildings.

Municipal Funeral Hall
Tama Art University Library
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion

The education of future architects has always been a concern of Toyo Ito. This is apparent in his teaching positions and in the recent rebuilding of the Silver Hut as part of the Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture in Omishima, which is used for workshops and research. Perhaps a more perfect example is his office, which is like a school where young architects come to work and learn. It is evident that while innovating and pushing the boundaries of architecture forward, he does not close the road behind him. He is a pioneer and encourages others to benefit from his discoveries and for them to advance in their own directions as well.

Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture

Toyo Ito is a creator of timeless buildings, who at the same time boldly charts new paths. His architecture projects an air of optimism, lightness and joy, and is infused with both a sense of uniqueness and universality. For these reasons and for his synthesis of structure, space and form that creates inviting places, for his sensitivity to landscape, for infusing his designs with a spiritual dimension and for the poetics that transcend all his works, Toyo Ito is awarded the 2013 Pritzker Architecture Prize.

Museum for Baroque Art in Mexico

Source: pritzkerprize.com

Borea Ski Resort

Project name:
Typology:
Studio:
Architect:
Location:
Status:
Construction year:
Floor Area:
Floors:
Photography:
Collaborators:

Borea Ski Resort
Resort, Recreational
DEA Studio
DEA Studio
Peja, Kosovo
Concept project




Vizion Project

Peja will have on the near future a pedestrian boulevard & biking track of 1.2 km in its urban structure, that will connect Peja center with the proposed “Borea” square, as finalization of the recreational and functional pathway. This represents DEA studio macro scale conceptual proposal on the macro context of the city.

Finalization of the boulevard with cable car station, as a precise destination for the city, stimulates the design team to conceive the space around it as a public square with all the proper facilities in its perimeter geometry. The area around the cable car station is designed to be physically formulated by the volume of the hotel in the Western orientation of the site and the apart hotel in the Southern one.

The square itself is conceived to be not completely a flat one but it will be special with its “visual movement”. The trick of changing silhouettes through the interpretation of the ground level as the continuity of the existing hilly terrain morphology of the site East orientation.

The arrival in “Borea” square will give to the people the impression of a space shared in between the nature and human creation.  At the same time it will be a preliminary psychological preparation for their later on nature destination towards the mountains. The square will have its focal element, as a vice-versa arrival point, the cable car station. Its deconstructivist architecture is not by case …, but … like an urban sculpture properly in the gravity area, it could sign the landmark of “Borea Resort”.

The silhouette changes and the architecture “play” with the alternation of the levels does not remain a detached detail of the entire “urban scenery” of the complex. It is clearly identified even in the architecture of the resort, through the silhouette of the proposed buildings, which appears “troubled”, but not occasionally in analogy with the wonderful silhouette of the Mountains on their background.

All around the functional urban space will appear a different silhouette with different emotions and spatial effects, that could potentially stick up the complex itself and could be … why not … its identikit noted in the world of global tourism. The resort will be not dedicated only to the winter season sports, but long year with different sports like, hiking, mountain biking, alpinist, skateboard‍, rollers, ping pong, basketball, volleyball, etc.